USE CASE MODELING KURT BITTNER PDF

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Use cases are a simple, straightforward -- yet very powerful -- way to express the functional requirements or behaviors of a system. Use cases have gained widespread acceptance because they make requirements less ambiguous by specifying exactly when and under what conditions certain behaviors occur.

As a result, those who effective employ use cases to model their systems can better deliver projects on time, within budget, and with fewer defects. However, use case modeling is not that easy; it is a practice that comes with characteristics that can impact a project. In this new book, the authors allow you to benefit from their considerable experience making use cases work well in a number of different environments.

With the advice, tips, and tricks presented herein, the reader will be further along the path to understanding and exploiting the power of use cases, and ultimately constructing better applications. In writing this book, the authors have worked closely with use case founder Ivar Jacobson, and the book is unique in that it presents a Rational Software Corporation-centric examination of this topic.

Preface: Why Bother with Use Cases? Developers who effectively employ use cases deliver better applications--on time and under budget.

The concept behind use cases is perhaps as old as software itself; they express the behavior of systems in terms of how users will ultimately interact with them. Despite this inherent simplicity, the use case approach is frequently misapplied, resulting in functional requirements that are confusing, cumbersome, or redundant.

In Use Case Modeling , experienced use case practitioners Kurt Bittner and Ian Spence share their tips and tricks for applying use cases in various environments. They delve into all aspects of use case modeling and management, demonstrating how development teams can capitalize on the approach's simplicity when modeling complex systems. The book draws extensively on best practices developed at Rational Software Corporation, and presents real-life examples to illustrate the considerable power of use case modeling.

As such, Use Case Modeling is sure to give development teams the tools they need to translate vision and creativity into systems that satisfy the most rigorous user demands. He has twenty years of experience in software development, including work in requirements capture, analysis, design, development, and project and product management.

A senior consultant at Rational Software, Ian Spence specializes in the adoption of the Rational Unified Process and the use case driven approach that it recommends. He has over eighteen years of experience in the software industry, covering the complete development lifecycle, including requirements capture, architecture, analysis, design, implementation, and project management. Use Case Modeling Zoom. Product information Description Use cases are a simple, straightforward -- yet very powerful -- way to express the functional requirements or behaviors of a system.

How to Read This Book. Actors and Use Cases. Use-Case Diagrams. Types of Requirements. Functional and Nonfunctional Requirements. The Role of Use Cases. When Are Use Cases Useful? General Principles of Use-Case Modeling. Rules of Thumb. Fundamentals of Use Case Modeling. The Use-Case Model. Use Cases. Connecting Actors and Use cases.

Brief Descriptions. Use-Case Descriptions. Supporting Artifacts. Supplementary Specifications. Declarative and Special Requirements. Establishing the Vision. Introducing Stakeholders and Users. What Are Stakeholders? The Role of Stakeholders and Stakeholder Representatives. Stakeholders and Use-Case Modeling. Step 1: Identify Stakeholder and User Types. Step 2: Identify and Recruit the Stakeholder Representatives.

Step 3: Involve the Stakeholder Representatives in the Project. Creating a Shared Vision. Analyze the Problem. Understand the Key Stakeholder and User Needs. Provide an Overview of the Product. Finding Actors and Use Cases. Finding Actors. Start by Identifying the Primary Actors. Work from the Specific to the General. Don't Forget the Supporting Actors.

Consider All Existing Requirements Information. Focus on the System Boundary. Identify the information sources.

Don't Preempt the Design. Focus First on the Familiar. Documenting Actors. How to Name Actors. Don't Overgeneralize. Give Every Actor a Brief Description. Characterize the Actors. Finding Use Cases. Start by Identifying the Actor Goals. Don't Worry About Commonality at least at first.

Focus on Value. Derive the Use Cases from the System's Vision. Documenting Use Cases. Associate the Use Cases to their Actors. Name the Use Cases.

Give every Use Case a Brief Description. Outline the Use Cases. Trace the Use Cases to the Features and Constraints. Reasons for Having a Workshop. To Transfer Expertise. To Build a Team. To Create Shared Understanding. To Tap into the Creative Power of a Group.

Preparing for the Workshop. Train the Participants. Understand the Vision. Keep the Group Small and Involved. Vary the Composition of the Group. Select a Facilitator. Set Objectives for the Workshop.

Schedule the Workshop and Organize the Facilities. Finding a Mentor. Find an Effective Communicator. Find a Skilled Motivator and Manager. Find a Mentor with Full Lifecycle Experience. Don't Use the Mentor as a Crutch. Structuring the Workshop. Define the Ground Rules for the workshop. Understand the Problem. Define the Boundary of the System. Identify Actors.

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ISBN 13: 9780201709131

Use cases are a simple, straightforward -- yet very powerful -- way to express the functional requirements or behaviors of a system. Use cases have gained widespread acceptance because they make requirements less ambiguous by specifying exactly when and under what conditions certain behaviors occur. As a result, those who effective employ use cases to model their systems can better deliver projects on time, within budget, and with fewer defects. However, use case modeling is not that easy; it is a practice that comes with characteristics that can impact a project.

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Use Case Modeling

See the latest about a temporary release delay on new titles. Learn more. View Larger Image. Register your product to gain access to bonus material or receive a coupon. Developers who effectively employ use cases deliver better applications--on time and under budget.

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Use cases are a simple, straightforward -- yet very powerful -- way to express the functional requirements or behaviors of a system. Use cases have gained widespread acceptance because they make requirements less ambiguous by specifying exactly when and under what conditions certain behaviors occur. As a result, those who effective employ use cases to model their systems can better deliver projects on time, within budget, and with fewer defects. However, use case modeling is not that easy; it is a practice that comes with characteristics that can impact a project. In this new book, the authors allow you to benefit from their considerable experience making use cases work well in a number of different environments.

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Use cases are a simple, straightforward -- yet very powerful -- way to express the functional requirements or behaviors of a system. Use cases have gained widespread acceptance because they make requirements less ambiguous by specifying exactly when and under what conditions certain behaviors occur. As a result, those who effective employ use cases to model their systems can better deliver projects on time, within budget, and with fewer defects. However, use case modeling is not that easy; it is a practice that comes with characteristics that can impact a project. In this new book, the authors allow you to benefit from their considerable experience making use cases work well in a number of different environments.

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