LENIN IN ZURICH BY ALEXANDER SOLZHENITSYN PDF

This excerpt from Solzhenitsyn's projected multi-volume work on the Russian Revolution shows Lenin stewing in Switzerland during World War I, from to the spring of , when, with the assistance of the German government, he returned to Russia to turn the liberal February Revolution into a Bolshevik seizure of power. Solzhenitsyn's Lenin is a pudgy, compulsive, humorless fellow, chronically frustrated by finances and colleagues. Interior monologue—which lacks the genuine empathy of Solzhenitsyn's earlier fiction—depicts his vexed relationship with French revolutionary Inessa Armand his lover and with his wife Natalya, who "stayed, determined never to stand in his way. Never to show her hurt. To train herself not to feel it.

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Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book. With incomparable knowledge of the events and people, Solzhenitsyn explores and clarifies the crucial years and draws a compelling psychological portrait of the man who was the architect of the Revolution. Lenin in Zurich chronicles Lenin's frustrating exile in Switzerland, from his arrest in Cracow and subsequent flight to Zurich at the outbreak of World War I to his departure for Russia in in a sealed train protected by the German government, years in which Lenin stood alone, without support from the deeply divided European socialist movement and isolated from his fellow revolutionaries.

Solzhenitsyn examines the private man as well as the familiar public figure, concentrating on facets of Lenin's personality and behavior that have been glossed over in most books about him: his disillusionment and dejection over the future of the Bolshevik cause, his love for lnessa Armand, his preoccupation with the difficulties of subsidizing the activities of his party, and, most important, his secret safe-passage and financial arrangements with the Germans.

The Lenin that emerges is not the distant, omniscient leader and theoretician but a man of human proportions with human needs, weaknesses, and concerns. Solzhenitsyn has set himself the task of establishing the truth of Russia's early revolutionary years and of probing the character of the man who had such an indelible impact on his country's fate.

Lenin in Zurich fulfills the challenge of this task, reaffirming once again Solzhenitsyn's remarkable vision and his vital place in world literature. The mental intensity is there - and few do it better than Solzhenitsyn. But rather than being that which drives normal men in extraordinary situations such an in his 'Cancer Ward' or 'One Day.. Solzhenitsyn portrays Lenin's success as largely accidental, his only talent being to destroy every one of his potential rival's reputation while waiting in the wings.

This is character assassination par excellence, and who could begrudge Solzhenitsyn the indulgence of taking a small time-out to drag the reputation of the Saint of communism down into the mud for a while - particularly as Lenin was perhaps a greater hater than Solzhenitsyn himself. Is there any place for the reader in all of this? At the end of the day I felt more 'used' than entertained, that in some great calculus of truth or justice I'd given Solzhenitsyn a 'tick' by making the effort to read this.

I wondered why I had bothered. I could at least appreciate Sozhenitsyn as a great miner of facts and gossip and braced myself to tackle a real biography of Lenin that I've had on hold for about twenty years unread.

But this was a case of being driven to take this step, rather than being inspired to do so, and I can't find any reason to rate this book higher than a curiosity for folk who already appreciate Solzhenitsyn. And if you get a taste for his searing honesty and ability to penetrate everything, I'd recommend 'Cancer Ward', my own pick for the most powerful novel of all time.

It is often difficult to tell how much of Solzhenitsyn's account is fact. I will probably have to read Willi Gautschi's "Lenin als Emigrant in der Schweiz" too, which was published around the same time. The first notable element of Lenin's stay in Switzerland was the complicity of the Austrian and German governments that enabled his entry and exit as an enemy citizen during wartime.

The folly of the German government to fuel Lenin's movement after the abdication of the tsar is probably the worst decision of the 20th century apart from starting WWI. If Solzhenitsyn is right, Lenin did not enjoy his stay in Switzerland.

While he made good use of the infrastructure, he disdained the relative prosperity and lack of revolutionary fervor. The Swiss Social Democrats of the war time were a timid lot. Only after the war did they strike which was brutally broken up. While some of their political claims were adopted in the Swiss parliament, it took the Social Democrats another world war to achieve a seat at the table of government.

As one poster of the recent Occupy Paradeplatz said in a typical Swiss diminutive "We think capitalism is not so good. The book had fallen into my hands by chance; I had had no intension of reading it.

But after weeks of opening it at random, reading a few sentences here and there, the narrative gained coherence. An image emerged from the pieces of the puzzle, blank spots filled in, some areas gained in strength, then stood out when re-read once, twice or more. Living with a work in this way is that how one should encounter all books?

The in-fighting. The suspicion. Parvus looms large. He will build himself a villa on Schwanenwerder. But most of the comrades will end up tortured and shot by Stalin. The authenticity of the account I cannot judge, neither the degree of fictional inventiveness in characterising the protagonists. For possible answers to that one, we have to turn to literature. Lenin knew he had something wrong with his brain and he had been told by Swiss specialists and an old Russian peasant that he might not live for very long.

I recommend Lenin in Zurich because I think Solzhenitsyn is a good writer. Revolutionary activity of Vladimir Lenin. Home Groups Talk Zeitgeist. Big news! LibraryThing is now free to all!

Read the blog post and discuss the change on Talk. I Agree This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and if not signed in for advertising. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms. Lenin in Zurich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Members Reviews Popularity Average rating Mentions 5 55, 3. No current Talk conversations about this book.

In his new book, Lenin in Zurich, Alexander Solzhenitsyn introduces the central character of his projected multi-volume account of Russian revolutionary history - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin.

You wouldn't want this to be the first Solzhenitsyn novel you ever read; else likely it would be the last as well.

The amount of mind-reading and fictionalizing events moves this book to or out of the boundaries of history. I encountered the work as if written on Zettel.

MeisterPfriem Jun 11, We read histories and biographies to know what happened. Belongs to Publisher Series LR, Scrittori italiani e stranieri Mondadori. You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data. Vladimir Lenin. Nadezhda Krupskaya. Karl Radek. Jakov Hanecki. Inessa Armand. Robert Grimm. Fritz Platten.

Nowy Targ, Lesser Poland, Poland. Rivoluzione del Grande Guerra. Rivoluzione di febbraio. LR, References to this work on external resources. No library descriptions found. Book description. Haiku summary. Add to Your books. Add to wishlist. Quick Links Amazon. Amazon Kindle 0 editions. Audible 0 editions. CD Audiobook 0 editions. Project Gutenberg 0 editions. Google Books — Loading Local Book Search. Swap 2 want. Rating Average: 3. Is this you?

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For more help see the Common Knowledge help page. Original publication date. Rivoluzione del Grande Guerra Rivoluzione di febbraio. Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers. Add to Your books Add to wishlist Quick Links.

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What was Lenin doing before the Russian Revolution? Read Alexander Solzhenitsyn to find out

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book. With incomparable knowledge of the events and people, Solzhenitsyn explores and clarifies the crucial years and draws a compelling psychological portrait of the man who was the architect of the Revolution. Lenin in Zurich chronicles Lenin's frustrating exile in Switzerland, from his arrest in Cracow and subsequent flight to Zurich at the outbreak of World War I to his departure for Russia in in a sealed train protected by the German government, years in which Lenin stood alone, without support from the deeply divided European socialist movement and isolated from his fellow revolutionaries. Solzhenitsyn examines the private man as well as the familiar public figure, concentrating on facets of Lenin's personality and behavior that have been glossed over in most books about him: his disillusionment and dejection over the future of the Bolshevik cause, his love for lnessa Armand, his preoccupation with the difficulties of subsidizing the activities of his party, and, most important, his secret safe-passage and financial arrangements with the Germans. The Lenin that emerges is not the distant, omniscient leader and theoretician but a man of human proportions with human needs, weaknesses, and concerns. Solzhenitsyn has set himself the task of establishing the truth of Russia's early revolutionary years and of probing the character of the man who had such an indelible impact on his country's fate.

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